Event 308: 8 May 2021

Today we completed our 7th Parkrun! And still loving it. I first heard about Parkrun when I was in Australia in 2019, as a Victoria friend on the course was always talking about a community run thing she volunteered at. It sounded fun! And coming out of a year of Covid, I decided it was time to get into some more fitness, and into more group activities. I was very excited to find there was a parkrun near me, and I could bring the pooch along too! She loves it (a bit too much) and it is such a great start to the weekend.

This Saturday's run conditions were calm and balmy, and it is a blessing to have such a pretty (and sheltered) place to run. I always tell myself that I am running downhill after the turn around, as rivers run downhill right? This week we had a few more visitors from other parts of NZ and even an international runner! Which is a nice sign that travel is starting again.

I'm fairly sure my dog thinks we are all hunting something (Our Personal best perhaps?!) and goes from her normally calm self to a baying manic as we all line up to start the run. As everyone else takes off, I try to distract her with treats till her barking subsides, and we too head off, the runners, the walkers, the sprinters and we. I was pretty happy with my pace the whole run, and definitely beginning to feel a bit fitter, although, there was still that moment, 3/4 in where, on finding no-one ahead of me, and no-one behind, I thought to myself maybe I could stop, have a little break... no-one would know. But I would know! So onwards I run, enjoying the sun, and the birds and the blue morning sky.

Esther

Esther

This week 107 people ran, jogged and walked the course, of whom 8 were first timers and 15 recorded new Personal Bests. Representatives of 7 different clubs took part.

The event was made possible by 10 volunteers:

Victoria PINFOLD • Bruce JENKINS • John GLYNN-BEGBIE • Kate JENKINS • Jacinta STRAKER • Michelle HOLMES • Graeme CROMPTON • Kimberly TAYLOR • Esther RICHARDSON • Alan REYNOLDS

Today's full results and a complete event history can be found on the Kapiti Coast parkrun Results Page.

The female record is held by Hannah OLDROYD who recorded a time of 18:19 on 17th February 2018 (event number 157).
The male record is held by Paul MARTELLETTI who recorded a time of 15:30 on 1st January 2020 (event number 257).
The Age Grade course record is held by Paul MARTELLETTI who recorded 88.06% (15:30) on 1st January 2020 (event number 257).

Kapiti Coast parkrun started on 24th January 2015. Since then 2,688 participants have completed 24,356 parkruns covering a total distance of 121,780 km, including 3,674 new Personal Bests. A total of 370 individuals have volunteered 3,056 times.

 

Event 306: 24 April 2021 – Hayden’s report

Kia ora and welcome to this week’s Kāpiti Coast Run Report, with tourist writers Hayden King and Annalese Lapwood (visiting from home runs Lower Hutt and Dunedin respectively). Please excuse all the Coast and Run based puns below, we really shouldn’t be trusted with all this power… that’s foreshore.

ANZAC weekend was a little getaway, up the coast from the capital city. For us, Kāpiti rounded out a different parkrun event each weekend of April. As we hunkered down in our little hut on Te Horo beach Friday night, listening to the rain pummeling the roof, we were left wondering what sort of condition that would leave the track in the next day. Thankfully parkrun day was a beautiful crisp morning, (very humid too!), and the aftermath of last night was displayed only on the track. The morning started off a bit unnervy with missing timekeepers and barcode scanners — but full credit to the Kāpiti Coast faithful who put their hands up at the last moment to volunteer and make this event sail smoothly.

This allowed 112 people to run, jog, walk, dodge and side-step the puddles to cross the line. Shout-out to the first male and female runners who did this so effortlessly, Jeroen MATTHEUS and Lucy LAWLOR.

Of that group we had 15 first timers, 4 of whom ran their first ever parkrun! Welcome to the Parkrun whānau.

Dave OLIVER • Hayden KING • Anthea OLIVER • Mike PROUDFOOT (first ever) • Nick BALL (first ever) • Allan CAMERON (first ever) • Annalese LAPWOOD • Alex TURNER • Aimee PROUDFOOT (first ever) • Florrie KERR • Joanne MAGILL • Alison KING • Megan BIGG • Lara GEHLEN (first ever) • Aschwin GEHLEN (first ever).

We also witnessed 9 new personal bests – congratulations to:

Jeroen MATTHEUS • Zane WAKELING • Jordan HORRELL • Zamira HARDY • Mari DAVENPORT • Lynne RUSSELL • Laura MILESTONE • Fiona ROWAN-THOMSON • Oscar CLARK

Another massive congratulations to the milestone runners that were recognised this week who we think truly embody the phrase: “Been there, run that, got the t-shirt”. Karen POTGIETER smashing 250, Michael PEARCE hitting 100, and Anna PATTERSON reaching 50 last week, and coming back for 51 this week!

Thanks again to the Kapiti team for allowing us this opportunity to write this report – it’s been a bundle of run... Just another reminder that these events can’t happen without the support of our active volunteers. There are various roles where you can still participate and volunteer at the same time too. Why not get involved and volunteer?

Sea you next Saturday!

Hayden KING and Annalese LAPWOOD

 

 

Event 306: 24 April 2021 – Alison’s report

This parkrunday was my first official visit to Kapiti Coast parkrun, but I was already familiar with the course.

Last month I was one of the bus load of parkrunners on what’s known as the longest day, or Bruce’s Bus.

We started at Lower Hutt parkrun and finished at Trentham Memorial, running and walking at four others along the way.

Kapiti Coast was our third that day.

I’m trying to complete all of New Zealand’s parkruns (on a Saturday and with a recorded time) so I had to return to Otaihanga Domain.

The rain overnight was an ominous sign but we awoke to sunshine and a glorious autumn day.

There were 112 finishers at this event, with a mix of locals and visitors from Wellington, Napier and myself from Rotorua (my home run is Puarenga parkrun).

There were nine in all visiting this parkrun for the first time. As well as myself, Megan Bigg, Florrie Kerr, Joanne Magill, Annalese Lapwood, Hayden King, Alex Turner, Anthea Oliver and Dave Oliver were visitors.

There were six parkrunners using their barcode for the very first time.

Welcome to Aimee Proudfoot, Allan Cameron, Aschwin Gehlen, Lara Gehlen, Mike Proudfoot and Nick Ball.

Congratulations on your first finish, may your Saturday mornings never be the same again!

Nine parkrunners achieved personal bests.

Well done to Fiona Rowan Thomson, Jeroen Mattheus, Jordan Horrell, Laura Milestone, Lynne Russell, Mari Davenport, Oscar Clark, Zamira Hardy and Zane Wakeling.

It was great to see a range of milestone shirts, and today we celebrated Karien Potgieter achieve her 250 milestone and Michael Pearce who has run 100 parkruns.

To those who are only just starting their parkrun lives these numbers may seem out of reach, but all you need to do is be consistent – show up as often as you can and you will get there too.

We can’t do parkrun without the volunteers, so a big hand goes to Brittany CALDER • John GLYNN-BEGBIE • Joanna JENKINS • Lucy LAWLOR • Gary CRILLEY • Alison KING • René GREYLING • Sandy CHAN • Graeme CROMPTON • Bruce WILSON • Hayden KING • Aimee PROUDFOOT.

There is a milestone shirt for those who have volunteered on 25 occasions, from September 1 there will be shirts to match the running milestones.

Volunteers don’t do it for the shirts, if you’ve not yet volunteered give it a go.

You can download the Virtual Volunteer app and have a play at home so you can confidently give it a go in the field.

The beauty of parkrun is that once you have registered you can run anywhere. I’m on a quest to complete all in New Zealand and I hope to achieve that this year.

I’ve written a book about all the New Zealand runs to share their origins and help parkrunners get the most of their weekends.

parkrun tourism is a huge passion of mine, some parkrunners combine parkrun with other passions. I like to tell stories – or at least, I collect stories to share on my blog.

You can find out more about parkrunners I’ve come across on my travels over at www.runswithabarcode.co.nz and if you want to share your story I’d love to hear from you.

Alison King A2147564

 

Event 303: 3 April 2021

Another glorious Kapiti day as Parkrun Kapiti had it’s last event this year before the end of daylight savings.

Kind of apt that today being Easter weekend also happens to be run #303 . Not a lot of rabbits about as one can only presume they were busy getting the eggs ready for tomorrow?

Crisp but clear conditions greeted the 103 participants today.

A few puddles greeted the runners on the first & last 500mt of the course but other than that pretty good conditions underfoot all round.

Great to see 8 first timers out there today. Mix that in with 14 PB’s achieved as well.

Hope everyone enjoys the rest of their long weekend and best of luck to those in next weekends Great Forrest Run in Waitarere.

Terry

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Event 302: 27 March 2021

One of the things I love about parkrun is that it's as casual or serious as you make it.  You can show up and jog it once a year, or you can race it every single weekend.  You can include parkrun in your travels and visit a new course when you're in town, or you can plan your travels around parkrun.  You can even choose to run all the parkrun courses in the lower North Island in one day, which is what I did last Sunday.

The event is organised by one of the regulars at Lower Hutt parkrun, and most of the 30 odd runners were from the Hutt, although a few were from further afield including Anderson (Napier) and Puarenga (Rotorua) parkruns.  I have done this once before, two years ago.  (Last year the trip was cancelled because we were in lockdown.)  Two years ago there were only 5 parkruns in the lower North Island; with the recent opening of Trentham Memorial Parkrun, we had to include that as well, so 25km became 30km.  We all chipped in and hired a bus for the day to transport us between parkruns, because what could be better than a bus full of like-minded sweaty runners?

The day began with a drive to Lower Hutt, leaving Kapiti at six so we could say hi to our old friends and hit the start line at seven.  We trotted round the course on fresh legs, blissfully unaware of the pain and stiffness that would follow later in the day.  This parkrun is an out and back along the Hutt River, a flat fast course mostly on concrete paths.

With the first run out of the way, we piled onto the bus and headed to Porirua, and received our goodie bags, which consisted of jet planes, bliss balls and muesli bars.  Porirua is easily my favourite course, it starts with a gentle climb through tree-lined paths on the way up, and a speedy zoom down on the way back.  Due to the climb, you're unlikely to get a PB on this course, but the scenery is worth it - there's just something I love about running through trees and bush.

Back on the bus with a quick stop at Plimmerton for a coffee, where the folks at Palmers served 30 odd runners in record time, then off to Kapiti Coast parkrun.  Feeling the home turf advantage, I shot off and completed my fastest run of the day, showing the Lower Hutt folk how it's done on the Coast.

We opted not to stop at a cafe for lunch this time, as last time it caused us to be badly behind schedule and we ended up running Greytown Woodside Trail in the dark, so we picnicked in the Domain instead.  A gang of three ducks stole my scone; fortunately the other runners had over-catered and came to my aid with carrot cake, watermelon and sushi.  Then a quick wardrobe change before getting back on the bus and heading to Palmerston North.

Palmerston North parkrun is another out-and-back riverside track, this time alongside the Manawatu River, and like Lower Hutt, this one is run on concrete paths so there are no mud puddles to negotiate.  When we got back to the bus, we found our bus driver had fallen down the bus steps and hit his head.  He bravely carried on anyway, swapping with another driver when we reached the Wairarapa.

Our new driver delivered us to the Carterton public facilities, a highlight of the trip.  Everyone piled off the bus - the queues were too long at Palmerston North so hardly anyone bothered to go there.  Then onwards to Greytown.  I was leading the pack for the first 2km, when all of a sudden the course turned onto the road.  Wait, am I going the right way?  Where are the marshalls? I don't remember this - but last time it was pitch dark so of course I don't remember.  Thankfully the runner behind me caught up and pointed out the cone markers that were right in front of my face.  If anyone's going to get lost, it will be me.

Our new driver entertained us over the Remutakas with his rendition of King of the Road (which involved gleefully tooting the horn), and a Princess Diana joke that I won't repeat. Last stop was the brand new Trentham Memorial parkrun, which like all the others is an out-and-back, but on this one you do a little loop through the trees on the way back.  The quad and calf pain had well and truly started at this stage and I struggled to get through, but I finished without stopping.

While we were running Trentham, our second bus driver managed to also fall down the steps of the bus.  Curious that out of approximately 30 runners running 30k each, the only injured parties were our bus drivers.  Luckily, our second bus driver wasn't badly hurt and dropped us off to the carpark at Lower Hutt parkrun at about 8pm, where we said goodbye to our friends and drove back to Kapiti in the dark.

Thinking of joining us next time? Here are my tips:

  • Bring a hydration bladder if you have one, it holds more and takes up less space in your bag than drink bottles.
  • Bring AT LEAST one change of gear; trust me, you don't want to do six 5ks in the same pair of undies.
  • Bring something to do on the bus (I'm reading Feet in the Clouds by Richard Askwith, highly recommended for trail runners and other crazies).
  • You'll get used to the smell.
  • Pace yourself! My first run was my slowest of the day. Resist the temptation to do your normal parkrun speed.
  • Six 5ks is harder on your body than running 30k straight.  Especially with an hour or more of sitting down between each run.  Make sure you warm up/cool down appropriately for EVERY run.
  • Train!  You can't expect to run six 5ks in a row if all you've ever done is 5ks.  If you are comfortable doing a 20k run then you should be fine.
  • Use the toilet whenever you get a chance, you don't know how far away the next one is going to be!
  • Take a headlamp, antiperspirant, sunscreen, rain gear, warm clothes, snacks, and expect delays.
  • Maybe take a spare bus driver or two as well...

Kristina

 

This week 98 people ran, jogged and walked the course, of whom 9 were first timers and 10 recorded new Personal Bests. Representatives of 6 different clubs took part.

The event was made possible by 12 volunteers:

Jeff STARK • John GLYNN-BEGBIE • Stella MURPHY • Bruce ALLEN • Ariki VERTONGEN • Adam LAWLOR • Kristina CAMERON • René GREYLING • Annabel LOGAN • Brian NELSON • Carolyn MARSHALL • Cath BRADDOCK

Today's full results and a complete event history can be found on the Kapiti Coast parkrun Results Page.

The female record is held by Hannah OLDROYD who recorded a time of 18:19 on 17th February 2018 (event number 157).
The male record is held by Paul MARTELLETTI who recorded a time of 15:30 on 1st January 2020 (event number 257).
The Age Grade course record is held by Paul MARTELLETTI who recorded 88.06% (15:30) on 1st January 2020 (event number 257).

Kapiti Coast parkrun started on 24th January 2015. Since then 2,636 participants have completed 23,753 parkruns covering a total distance of 118,765 km, including 3,604 new Personal Bests. A total of 356 individuals have volunteered 2,990 times.

 

Event 294: 23 January 2021

On Saturday 23 January a field of 140, including 12 first timers took to the track for the 294th event on the 6th anniversary of the Kapiti Parkrun.

With good weather and track conditions, an added incentitive of a piece of birthday cake (kindly made by Belinda Wilson), saw 7 PBS achieved.

In January 2015 a newspaper article advised that a new Parkrun would commence at the Otaihanga Domain on 24/1/15. The article explained what Parkrun was about and how to register.

As I had not previously heard of Parkrun I thought it may be worth attending at least once, even if it was to get a timed run. Little did I know that over the next 6 years I would continue to return most Saturday mornings along with many others from that first day to run.

The positives of Parkrun participation are immeasurable, and we owe a great debt to all involved in providing it for us, long may it continue.

Linsay May.

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Photo credit: Jeff Stark

This week 140 people ran, jogged and walked the course, of whom 12 were first timers and 7 recorded new Personal Bests. Representatives of 6 different clubs took part.

The event was made possible by 11 volunteers:

Jake ROOS • Jude WADSWORTH • Linsay MAY • Jeff STARK • John GLYNN-BEGBIE • Lucy LAWLOR • Gary CRILLEY • Adam LAWLOR • Kristin HICKLING • Karl ROMIJN • Carol MAY

Today's full results and a complete event history can be found on the Kapiti Coast parkrun Results Page.

The female record is held by Hannah OLDROYD who recorded a time of 18:19 on 17th February 2018 (event number 157).
The male record is held by Paul MARTELLETTI who recorded a time of 15:30 on 1st January 2020 (event number 257).
The Age Grade course record is held by Paul MARTELLETTI who recorded 88.06% (15:30) on 1st January 2020 (event number 257).

Kapiti Coast parkrun started on 24th January 2015. Since then 2,582 participants have completed 22,932 parkruns covering a total distance of 114,660 km, including 3,499 new Personal Bests. A total of 344 individuals have volunteered 2,898 times.

 

Event 293: 16 January 2021

After a week of lovely summer weather on the Kapiti Coast, Saturday morning (aka parkrun-morning) started off a little cloudy, but dry and calm. Perfect conditions for a run!!

As I turned into Otaihanga Domain it was fabulous to see a large number of people already milling around the start line. Familiar, friendly faces as well as some guests from ‘overseas’ ie the South Island, line up at the start. It’s always nice to have new parkrun participants, and I wish a warm Kapiti welcome to our 29 first timers. I hope you all had a good time and you’ll be back to join us again soon.

We are so lucky to be able to enjoy this experience considering the large number of countries struggling with COVID. I feel almost guilty reporting back to friends and family overseas the freedom that we are enjoying. On that note I hope everyone signed into the Domain using their COVID tracer app!!

The briefing is given, our canine companions give their woof of approval, and we’re off. The pre-race chatter soon turns into the sound of footsteps on the ground and heavy breathing.

Today was my first parkrun for 2021, after a lazy start to the year. It was great to get out on course again today, and I was reminded why I like to make the effort to turn up!! I’m on a mission to try to run faster, rather than further, and I appreciate having people on course to keep me honest and pull me along to the finish line.

We had an amazing turnout today, with 153 people completing the course, including Dave Leigh who finished his 100th event – great effort.

See you next week

Kris

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Photo: Jeff Stark

This week 153 people ran, jogged and walked the course, of whom 29 were first timers and 11 recorded new Personal Bests. Representatives of 11 different clubs took part.

The event was made possible by 11 volunteers:

Tony FARMER • Arend LANSER • Jude WADSWORTH • Jeff STARK • John GLYNN-BEGBIE • Terry B MORRIS • Kristin HICKLING • Joseph LINDSAY • Michelle HOLMES • Graeme CROMPTON • Bruce WILSON

Today's full results and a complete event history can be found on the Kapiti Coast parkrun Results Page.

The female record is held by Hannah OLDROYD who recorded a time of 18:19 on 17th February 2018 (event number 157).
The male record is held by Paul MARTELLETTI who recorded a time of 15:30 on 1st January 2020 (event number 257).
The Age Grade course record is held by Paul MARTELLETTI who recorded 88.06% (15:30) on 1st January 2020 (event number 257).

Kapiti Coast parkrun started on 24th January 2015. Since then 2,570 participants have completed 22,792 parkruns covering a total distance of 113,960 km, including 3,492 new Personal Bests. A total of 343 individuals have volunteered 2,887 times.

 

Event 286: 12 December 2020

This week's run report, features a lady who gives me the inspiration to keep up my running and to keep coming along to Parkrun.

Hazel Ollerenshaw hadn't come from a sporty background, but after devoting many years to bringing up 5 children and juggling time to do a degree via correspondence, Hazel decided it was time for "Me". So at 58, she took up running, with a goal to lose some weight and lost 20kg.

Hazel then decided to push the boundaries further and entered Kapiti women's tri about 16/17 years ago and has competed just about every year since. She is currently training to do the February 2021 race - 400m swim, 12km Bike and 4km Run. Doesn't sound far, but to put the 3 together, takes training, discipline and determination and is quite an achievement when your 75.

Hazel has also done the Lake Taupo cycle race (half) 7 times and completed the whole 160km cycle race, when she was 70. Hazel has also competed in the Marines run several times, which is held each year by the Kapiti Joggers and for those of you have done this course, will know that it is not for the faint hearted.

Hazel loves to come along to the Kapiti Parkrun as she loves the friendly atmosphere and sets herself the goal to try and beat her own times, each week.

Hope this inspires you as it does me. See you all at Park run. Go Hazel!

- by Kate J 131097885_3531744893546804_4109867214132658284_oPhoto: Hazel

Credit: Jeff Stark

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Photo: Kate

Credit: Jeff Stark

This week 84 people ran, jogged and walked the course, of whom 2 were first timers and 5 recorded new Personal Bests. Representatives of 4 different clubs took part.

Thevent was made possible by 12 volunteers:

Jake ROOS • Jeff STARK • John GLYNN-BEGBIE • Jocelyn FOUNTAIN • Lucy LAWLOR • Kate JENKINS • Adam LAWLOR • Daniel STONER • Dave THORBURN • Michelle HOLMES • Graeme CROMPTON • Andrew MORRISON

Today's full results and a complete event history can be found on the Kapiti Coast parkrun Results Page.

The female record is held by Hannah OLDROYD who recorded a time of 18:19 on 17th February 2018 (event number 157).
The male record is held by Paul MARTELLETTI who recorded a time of 15:30 on 1st January 2020 (event number 257).
The Age Grade course record is held by Paul MARTELLETTI who recorded 88.06% (15:30) on 1st January 2020 (event number 257).

Kapiti Coast parkrun started on 24th January 2015. Since then 2,479 participants have completed 22,088 parkruns covering a total distance of 110,440 km, including 3,438 new Personal Bests. A total of 336 individuals have volunteered 2,814 times.

 

Event 282: 14 November 2020

Tena koe parkrun whanau and Talofa lava

parkrun tourism took me to sunny Kapiti last weekend.  This was my first opportunity to do some parkrun tourism since Hobsonville Auckland in January 2020.  It’s been a crazy year.

I managed to squeeze this run in on our family road trip from Wainuiomata to Ohau.  I know there are parkrun enthusiasts who plan their holidays around parkrun.  There is no better time to do that than Alert Level One particularly as New Zealand now has a staggering 32 parkrun events.  Ticking Kapiti off my list takes my score to a pultry six, so many more road trips are definitely needed!

I joined a field of 96 hearty souls on a perfect morning for running.  The course is a generous flat one which runs alongside Waikanae River and also, probably unique to any parkrun course - under the SH1 Expressway!  The course is an out and back, made up of a mix of gravel and dirt track which fortunately was nice and dry.

It was nice to catch up with work colleague Glen CATTERMOLE for a post-run chat (see pic).  Glen and I are part of a boot camp-style circuits group run at the Department of Internal Affairs.  The Department also offers us subsidised entry fees to Round The Bays.  These are just a couple of examples of how the Department helps promote mental health and wellbeing in the workplace - so crucial in this day and age.  We have four parkrun regulars at the Department so there’s more marketing work to be done there!

parkrun Kapiti is a very friendly flat course with a great group of volunteers, headed ably by run director, Dave.  Crucially for me, there is a children’s playground at the start area where my three lil ‘uns entertained themselves with mum.

I will definitely be back at Otaihanga Domain again whenever our next road trip “up the line” is.  Have a great week all.  Stay safe.

Nga mihi,

Vatau SAGAGA

Picture 1

This week 96 people ran, jogged and walked the course, of whom 3 were first timers and 12 recorded new Personal Bests. Representatives of 6 different clubs took part.

The event was made possible by 11 volunteers:

Declan MURPHY • John GLYNN-BEGBIE • Bruce ALLEN • Ross WELLS • Dave THORBURN • Michael PEARCE • Andre FRAENKEL • Ruth CARTER • Joanna MARTIN • Martyn COLE • Andrew MORRISON

Today's full results and a complete event history can be found on the Kapiti Coast parkrun Results Page.

The female record is held by Hannah OLDROYD who recorded a time of 18:19 on 17th February 2018 (event number 157).
The male record is held by Paul MARTELLETTI who recorded a time of 15:30 on 1st January 2020 (event number 257).
The Age Grade course record is held by Paul MARTELLETTI who recorded 88.06% (15:30) on 1st January 2020 (event number 257).

Kapiti Coast parkrun started on 24th January 2015. Since then 2,457 participants have completed 21,744 parkruns covering a total distance of 108,720 km, including 3,413 new Personal Bests. A total of 332 individuals have volunteered 2,768 times.

 

Event 281 7 November 2020

I thought that it would be a wonderful idea to get to know a little bit about our runners. So I decided that it would be great to feature them from time to time, in my run reports. I am starting off with someone who I have alot of respect for, both as a runner and a person.

Roger Childs came into running at a later stage than most, he was in his late 30's. A neighbour asked Roger if he would be interested in training for a marathon and so began his running career.

Roger is a very experienced runner, having competed in distances from 5k to a full marathon, both on and off-road and has a swag of medals. His best 5k was at the Kapiti R&T Monday night road race when he was 49, posting 17.30. His best 21.1k was at Palmerston North, running 1.17.54 and a 2.45 for his best Marathon in Taranaki.

Roger says that one of his most memorable running moments, was when he ran the first leg (Wellington to Petone), in the Wellington to Masterton Relay - 11. 3k in 38.40. That's an impressive 3.25km pace! As soon as he finished, he jumped straight in his car and drove to Auckland with his son.

Roger has played a huge part in my early running days, helping me to pace for a half, then a marathon and then an ultra marathon. We have run many hundreds of kms together in all sorts of weather and on every run, he has always had many a story to tell (mostly about running of course).

There's more to Roger than meets the eye. He has been a teacher at Kapiti college, where he taught our very own Peter Jackson. Also taught at the correspondence school, spending lunch breaks with fellow runners up in the hills 8hrsaround Wellington and now volunteers for many causes.

When asked what inspires Roger to keep running and what draws him to Parkrun, he said this. "I love running because of the company, the environments and the challenge. The non-competitive runs with people are great because there is plenty of time to chat and solve the problems of the world. Parkrun is fantastic because it has a friendly atmosphere and gives people if all ages and abilities, the chance to improve with the encouragement of fellow runners/walkers and officials."

Happy running everyone,

Kate

 

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Photos: Jeff Stark

This week 99 people ran, jogged and walked the course, of whom 11 were first timers and 5 recorded new Personal Bests. Representatives of 4 different clubs took part.

The event was made possible by 12 volunteers:

Caroline Emma JOHNSTON • Sarah BEGBIE • Michael MEAKIN • Zoe COOPER • Jeff STARK • John GLYNN-BEGBIE • Amber RAMOO • Dave THORBURN • Andre FRAENKEL • Colleen CARROLL • Carissa-Lee SKIPPER • Andrew MORRISON

Today's full results and a complete event history can be found on the Kapiti Coast parkrun Results Page.

The female record is held by Hannah OLDROYD who recorded a time of 18:19 on 17th February 2018 (event number 157).
The male record is held by Paul MARTELLETTI who recorded a time of 15:30 on 1st January 2020 (event number 257).
The Age Grade course record is held by Paul MARTELLETTI who recorded 88.06% (15:30) on 1st January 2020 (event number 257).

Kapiti Coast parkrun started on 24th January 2015. Since then 2,454 participants have completed 21,648 parkruns covering a total distance of 108,240 km, including 3,401 new Personal Bests. A total of 330 individuals have volunteered 2,757 times.

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